Author: Rachel Flory

Heated Gaming Moments: What’s Acceptable? (Not Racism)

Felix Kjellberg once again has said something racist. In a livestream last week he used a racist slur. Noted buffoon Ian Miles Cheong chose to mischaracterise this as understandable; as Kjellberg, also known as PewDiePie, let loose the term whilst in a “heated gaming moment”–angry because he was momentarily losing at a game–Cheong suggested that both the phrase and its use were meaningless. In fact, of course, what a person has allowed themselves to become comfortable proclaiming (internally or externally) is what will come out of their mouth when they are excited and cross. If Kjellberg is comfortable with...

Read More

Dreamy Dads of DDADDS: Our Dadveal

We in the Games Section, like the rest of the internet, are obsessed with Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator, or DDADDS for short. Over the next few weeks you’ll see a variety of opinions and essays from us about this new cultural icon, but first: our Dads! *Corissa Haury’s Dreamy Dad: Doc Strixes “I’ve been out of the dating game for awhile now, taking care of my precious peach of a daughter as a single dad. I like to flirt but you might need to do the convincing. HMU 😉 “ Cathryn Sinjin-Starr’s Dating Dad: Jules Harlow “Likes rom-coms....

Read More

Seeing Myself in Wonderland: Mental Health in American McGee’s Alice – Part Two

This is the second part of a two-part piece. In case you haven’t already, be sure to click here and read part one first in order to acquaint yourself with how my history interweaves with that of Goth Alice in Depression Wonderland. Otherwise, you’ll probably be really confused. The next big battle is with the Jabberwock, and it was another battle I found myself personally invested in. The Jabberwock represents Alice’s survival guilt and insults her—“You selfish, misbegotten, and unnatural child!” being one of my favorite video game lines, ever. I could relate to this so much, since every day...

Read More

Seeing Myself in Wonderland: Mental Health in American McGee’s Alice

I have to admit, I’m a little embarrassed when I, a grown woman at the ripe age of 25, tell people that one of my favorite games is American McGee’s Alice. It definitely has connotations of early 2000s mall-goth culture. You know, kids who had Vampire Freaks accounts, worshiped The Nightmare Before Christmas, and wore t-shirts that said, “Normal people scare me.” Content Warning: This essay contains descriptions of suicidal ideation and self-harm. When I mentioned Alice to my roommate, he said, “Yeah, I’ve seen that game before. It looks, uh, edgy.” I’ll admit, the game hasn’t aged well...

Read More